Wearable ENDI Scattering Lining

Discussion in 'Approved' started by PrivateNomad, Feb 12, 2019.

  1. PrivateNomad

    PrivateNomad There goes my hero, watch him as he goes Staff Member Technician Gold Donator Event Builder

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    Name: ENDI Scattering Lining

    Description:
    ENDI Scattering Lining is a simple foil sheet of aegisalt foil, mixed with small particles of metamaterials that partially interact with neutrinos, causing them to scatter past the foil lining. This lining can be installed inside of clothing or armor and is used to prevent an object or person from being scanned by an ENDI beam scanner.

    Abilities:
    • Scatters ENDI scanner beams, causing scan results to be indecipherable.
    • Passive, requires no electronics.
    • Negligible weight
    • Has a side effect of scattering neutrino communication beams.

    Limitations:
    • Does not "fake out" the scan results. The scanner will return an error due to the scattering; this is obviously suspicious if the scanner is manned by a person at a checkpoint. However, if the object scanned is hid within a much larger object that was being scan (example: a small box covered in ENDI scattering tarp in a ship when the entire ship is scanned), the results will pass most verification algorithms' margin of error.
    • Major tears in the lining will reveal the shape of objects in the area of the cut.

    How does it work: The aegisalt metal foil is diffused with particles of metamaterial that interact with neutrinos which normally would not collide. This metamaterial is similar to those used in ENDI scanners themselves. Parts of the ENDI beam are scattered from the particles in the foil, making it impossible to accurately scan the object.

    Flavor text: Used by those valuing their privacy and those with something to hide, ENDI Scattering Linings are a simple way to prevent ENDI scans from determining one's molecular composition; this prevents somebody's identity as a Shifter or a synth from being revealed because they pass through an ENDI scanner. They are often woven into clothing or sometimes armor.

    Referenced Technologies (Optional): None

    Attainability: Open

    Tags: Industrial

    Category: Wearable.
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2019
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  2. 9K

    9K Galactic Officer Staff Member Administrator

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    Are there any types of scanning not mentioned in this application that it also blocks, aside from ENDI? If so, list them.

    Can it be assumed that this also essentially weighs the same as Aegisalt with a negligible weight increase when the lining is taken into account?

    What is this lining, aside from being made of "metamaterials?" Is it metallic, cloth-like or something else?

    Can the lining be applied to anything other than Aegisalt, since the lining is essentially what is doing the work in scattering the scanner? If so, what would the results of a scan on any other material with this lining look like?

    Assuming it isn't simply alloyed or something with Aegisalt, how would someone go about making this lining?
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2019
  3. PrivateNomad

    PrivateNomad There goes my hero, watch him as he goes Staff Member Technician Gold Donator Event Builder

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    Nope. Only neutrino-based scanning methods, which ENDI is the only one I'm aware of. If there's any scanning that would be blocked by aegisalt, there's those too.

    Yes, since the foil is very light. It'd actually be around the same mass of aluminum since they have comparable densities (0.097 lb/inch^3 vs 0.1 lb/inch^3)

    It's metallic foil.

    It's typically applied on aegisalt because its foil is a bit stronger than other metals like aluminum, while still being flexible. Though it can easily be applied to any foil.

    Tiny beads of the metamaterial are rolled along with aegisalt to create the foil. They're essentially "pebelled" in there, since it doesnt need to cover the whole foil to scatter neutrino beams.
     
  4. 9K

    9K Galactic Officer Staff Member Administrator

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    And would this at all affect the outcome of a scan?

    Why is this? It's been called a foil lining and now what essentially equates to more of a mesh of both with some peppered here and there. I would imagine in order to scatter the thing scanning a wide surface area it would need just as well to cover that surface in order to keep it from being scanned. These are rays of very tiny, fast-moving particles after all.
     
  5. PrivateNomad

    PrivateNomad There goes my hero, watch him as he goes Staff Member Technician Gold Donator Event Builder

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    1. Nope.

    2. I wouldn't call it a mesh; I'd more compare it to electrical steel, where it has some impurities in the form of silicone (the metamaterial in this case). As for the scanning, it doesn't need to cover the entire surface area to interrupt the beams; even scattering part of the beam would make the results unreadable. Compare it to packet loss in networking: if you lose 50% of all data packets you receive, you cannot interpret that data.
     
  6. 9K

    9K Galactic Officer Staff Member Administrator

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    In any case, I suppose my issue with it would be that there isn't too much said about how dense those impurities are in the metal. I would guess that if it's blocking and scattering these beams, that it's fairly dense and covers a large majority of the surface area of the thing being scanned even considering that it's kind of peppered all over it. If that isn't the case, I couldn't see how this could work quite as well, as you'd have large chunks of material uncovered, being directly hit by the scanner.

    My only proposal in light of all this, is that since that's the way it should reasonably work, damage to the lining in the form of cuts or punctures should still render it useless, over the area that's damaged. Basically if the lining is cut open in a certain area over some object like a weapon, while they won't be able to scan it and see "oh there's a weapon there," specifically, they'd be able to see that something is there, in the shape of that damaged spot.
     
  7. PrivateNomad

    PrivateNomad There goes my hero, watch him as he goes Staff Member Technician Gold Donator Event Builder

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    Yes, a shape could be revealed in the case of a cut lining.
     
  8. 9K

    9K Galactic Officer Staff Member Administrator

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    You should make the necessary edit above then. Where it says...
    "Major tears in the lining will still scatter the overall result."
     
  9. PrivateNomad

    PrivateNomad There goes my hero, watch him as he goes Staff Member Technician Gold Donator Event Builder

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    Done
     
  10. 9K

    9K Galactic Officer Staff Member Administrator

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    Passed.
     
  11. WowGain

    WowGain Bara King Staff Member Administrator Bronze Donator Event Builder

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    Seconded
     
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